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...design
David Ross coined the term ``Lizzy'' to refer to wearable computer systems of a modular design. Although he was originally referring to the Apple ][ architecture (as used in WearComp2), he has recently also come to use this term to denote the PC-104 wearable systems, as pioneered by Doug Platt. Thus the terms ``WearComp6'' and ``Lizzy'' both denote a hobbyist home-brew PC-104 architecture used at MIT, Toronto, and elsewhere, in addition to the earlier WearComp2 system.
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...batteries
WearComp2 used a 24 volt battery at one point, after which the design was changed to operate from a 12 volt battery. WearComp3 used a 4.8 volt battery comprised of four large NiCad cells connected in series and fixed to a belt.
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...machine
In our lab, this was located in the basement machine shop. Subsequent to my building a PC104 enclosure from sheet metal, others in the lab have also been successful in also building similar enclosures, e.g. Jeremy Levitan (see acknowledgements) has built a couple of such enclosures for Ken Russell, who drew the layout on paper. Levitan was our ``local expert'' on the use of the metal bending machine (and on the use of the machine shop in general). If you have never worked with a metal bending machine, it is a good idea to find a similar ``local expert'' who has the patience to teach you this art, and first practice on some scrap metal to become proficient in the use of the machine. This is a simple skill to learn, and will prove quite valuable.

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Steve Mann
Wed Dec 24 05:46:06 EST 1997