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Closing Keynote Speech:
Reconfigured Self as Basis for Humanistic Intelligence 1

Steve Mann
University of Toronto, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering
10 King's College Road, Toronto, Canada
mann@eecg.toronto.edu http://wearcomp.org/steve.html

USENIX-98, New Orleans June 15-19, 1998

Abstract:

John S. Quarterman asks the questions: ``Will the U.S. continue to contain more than half of the Internet? Will one company make all the software?''[1]. One could also ask related questions like ``Will one university or educational organization fabricate the future by manufacturing consensus of ideas and ideals?''. That the U.S. government, together with a single company, might control the world's information flow and software, and thus indirectly, the world's thoughts, ideas, etc., is a troubling thought to many. One possible solution to this problem is in the tradition of science, and thus the notion of disclosure and open peer review, as a basis for allowing anyone the option of acquiring, and thus advancing the world's knowledge base. A further construct called ``Humanistic Intelligence (HI)'', motivated by the philosophy of science, is proposed. HI provides a new synergy between humans and machines that seeks to involve the human rather than having computers emulate human thought or replace humans. Particular goals of HI are human involvement at the individual level, and providing individuals with tools to challenge society's pre-conceived notions of human-computer relationships. An emphasis in this article is on computational frameworks surrounding ``visual intelligence'' devices, such as video cameras interfaced to computer systems.



 
next up previous
Next: Problem statement
Steve Mann
1998-09-15